Exclusion in Health in Latin America and the Caribbean by Pan American Health Organization

Cover of: Exclusion in Health in Latin America and the Caribbean | Pan American Health Organization

Published by Pan American Health Organization in Washington .

Written in English

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About the Edition

This book presents the results of studies conducted between 2001 and 2003 in six countries of the Region - the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Paraguay, and Peru - with the objective of characterizing and measuring exclusion in health. The study forms part of a joint initiative between the Pan American Health Organization and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, and its findings will be of great use to decision- and policymakers at all levels throughout the regional public health community.

Edition Notes

Description based on print version record.

Book details

Classifications
LC ClassificationsRA441
The Physical Object
Format[electronic resource]
Pagination1 online resource (142 p.)
Number of Pages142
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25561132M
ISBN 109275127131
ISBN 109789275127131
OCLC/WorldCa476028420

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Get this from a library. Exclusion in health in Latin America and the Caribbean. [Sweden. Styrelsen för internationellt utvecklingssamarbete.; Pan American Health Organization. Area of. Exclusion in Health in Latin America and the Caribbean Contents Chapter 1: Conceptual Framework Why study Exclusion in Health in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Some definitions Causes of exclusion in health Premises of the study Chapter 2: Methodological Framework Study objective Factors related to the measurement of.

Get this from a library. Exclusion in health in Latin America and the Caribbean. [Sweden. Styrelsen för internationellt utvecklingssamarbete.; Pan American Health Organization.;] -- This book presents the results of studies conducted between and in six countries of the Region - the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Paraguay, and Peru - with the.

Exclusion in Health in Latin America and the Caribbean: PAHO Occasional Publication: PAHO: Millions of people in the Region of the Americas currently do not have access to health services and are excluded from the benefits of health protection systems.

This issue is of growing importance in the public policy arena, not only as a social. Social exclusion and poverty reduction in Latin America and the Caribbean (English) Abstract. This publication brings together the papers presented in the workshop, "Social Exclusion and Poverty Reduction workshop in the Latin America and the Caribbean Region", and the discussion process that took place by: Exclusion in Health in Latin America and the Caribbean and age characteristics that are associated with social exclusion in health; to distinguish its causative versus structural factors; and to identify which interven-tions, strategies or policies are most effective in reducing it.

By detecting these. Latin America and the Caribbean. Supporting health research systems development in Latin America Jorge Arriagada, Francisco Becerra, Martine Berger, Josefina Bonilla, Luis Gabriel Cuervo, Eduardo Espinoza, Moisés Goldbaum, Xinia Gomez, Sylvia de Haan, Carel IJsselmuiden, Wendy McFarren, Ernesto Medina, Suzanne Jacob Serruya and Zaida Yadon.

Millions of people in the Region of the Americas currently do not have access to health services and are excluded from the benefits of health protection systems. This issue is of growing importance in the public policy arena, not only as a social phenomenon that must be confronted and resolved, but also because of its potential use as an analytical tool to develop and evaluate interventions.

'Informality: Exit and Exclusion' analyzes informality in Latin America, exploring root causes and reasons for and implications of its growth.

The authors use two distinct but complementary lenses: informality driven by 'exclusion'' from state benefits or the circuits of the modern economy, and driven by voluntary 'exit' decisions resulting from private cost-benefit calculations that lead Cited by: MEXICO CITY, CMC – Head of the Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO), Dr.

Carissa F. Etienne, says the most important challenges to health and well-being in the Americas, including the Caribbean, are rooted in inequity and social exclusion. “Health is crucial to achieving the Agenda as a whole,” said the Dominican-born Etienne in. Delgado, Lai, Tan, and Schiavone Camacho, Chinese in Latin America, especially Mexico, and Two books on Chinese in Mexico and on Chinese in Latin America were reviewed by Dorothea A.

Martin for the H-Soz-u-Kult discussion list in December It is reproduced here under Creative Commons license. Social exclusion and poverty reduction in Latin America and the Caribbean: Exclusion social y reduccion de la pobreza en America Latina y el Caribe (Spanish) Abstract This publication brings together the papers presented in the workshop, "Social Exclusion and Poverty Reduction workshop in the Latin America and the Caribbean Region", and the Cited by: One of the first comparative reflections of its kind, this book examines the challenges that young men face when Exclusion in Health in Latin America and the Caribbean book to grow up in societies where violence is the norm.

Barker, who has worked directly with low-income youth and witnessed first hand the violence he describes, provides a compelling account of the young men's struggles. He discusses the problems these men face in other areas of.

Violence in Latin America and the Caribbean is no longer perpetrated primarily by states against their citizens, but by a variety of state and non-state actors. This book examines violence at the subnational level to illuminate how violence and vulnerability are embedded within subnational configurations of space and clientelistic : Tina Hilgers, Laura Macdonald.

Most countries in Latin America and the Caribbean are struggling to escape what economists label "the middle income trap." While much if not all of the region has emerged from low income status, neither growth nor productivity has increased sufficiently to enable Latin America to narrow the gap separating it from the world's most developed economies.

The Latin America and Caribbean region is making progress in opening the doors of development to all. This book assesses the health, unemployment insurance, active labor market interventions, in Latin America and the Caribbean By Hugo Nopo This book presents a comprehensive overview of gender and ethnic differences.

Social exclusion is the most dangerous threat that democracy faces in Latin America and the Caribbean. The advent of democracy in our region was the result of a dramatic social struggle that engaged the majority of the population under the banner of creating more modern, more prosperous, and fairer societies.

Indeed, the past quarter century. The United States’ geographic proximity to Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as its extensive trade, migration, and border relationships with countries in the hemisphere, makes addressing health issues in the Americas a matter of national Size: KB.

the Caribbean remains a poor cousin within Latin American studies, the burgeoning literature on social exclusion in the Arnericas rarely takes into l. 1extend my thanks to the workshop organizers and my profound gratitude ro CIare Sauunells.

Health and traditional medicine cultures in Latin America and the Caribbean Article (PDF Available) in Social Science & Medicine 21(1) February with Reads How we measure 'reads'. GENEVA (ILO News) - In Latin America and the Caribbean, 'more than million people, that is a third of the total population, do not have access to health services', ILO Executive Director Mary Chinery-Hesse told delegates assembled today in Mexico at the opening of an international conference on health care in Latin America and the Caribbean.

1 This means that one out of three persons in. These are the region's chronically poor, who have remained so despite unprecedented inroads against poverty in Latin America and the Caribbean since the turn of the century.

This book takes a closer look at the region’s entrenched poor, who and where they are, and how existing policies need to change to effectively assist the poor. Stigmatization and Access to Health Care in Latin America: Challenges and Perspectives• Cecilia Acuña[1] Mónica Bolis[ 2] PAHO/WHO Stigma associated with mental illness produces a series of adverse conditions that can result in exclusion in health.

From the perspective of health systems, however, this phenomenon has not been widely studied. Organization and Delivery of Health Care in Latin America and the Caribbean. The health sector faces two demands that appear, on first examination, to be contradictory: firstly, to provide expanded and equitable access to quality health care services and, secondly, to reduce or at least control the rising costs of health care services.

Equity and Exclusion in Latin America and the Caribbean: The Case of Indigenous and Afro-Descendant Peoples Article (PDF Available) in CEPAL review 76 January with ReadsAuthor: Alvaro Bello. This chapter concentrates on formal social security and its associated issues in Latin America and the Caribbean, and does not deal with programmes included under the broader definition of social security, such as famine prevention, agrarian reform, education, and employment promotion.

It explains that a major reason for this exclusion is that the ‘formal’ concept is typical of the LAC. This book highlights current debates about concepts, methods, and policies related to poverty in Latin America.

It focuses on child and adolescent well-being and the issue of inclusive societies. Its goal is to promote new and critical thinking about these issues globally and in Latin America. This collection offers a reappraisal of social policy in response to the scale of the challenges confronting Latin America.

Divided into four sections—Concepts, Models and Practice; Health and. health best practices” for development in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Belo Horizonte, Brazil, is informative as a multiple case study as the city has taken a proactive approach to public health, and four programs (participatory budgeting, Family Health Centers and physical academies, community mobilization againstFile Size: KB.

In different countries and regions of the world—particularly in Latin America and the Caribbean—the term “workers’ health” may have different meanings. From a more traditional perspective, defined on economic and demographic bases, this term introduces a delimitation characterized by economically active people, usually over 10 years of age, of both sexes, and who are working, have Author: René Mendes.

Social exclusion is closely linked with numerous economic problems in Latin America, yet seldom does it take the form of a "keep out"sign. More commonly, groups are excluded because they lack access to opportunities enjoyed by others in health care, education, housing and employment.

These barriers prevent people from reaching their full productive potential -- in turn constraining growth and. Nonetheless, progress has been made and important lessons learned.'Infrastructure in Latin America and the Caribbean' explores the extraordinary transformations that have shaped infrastructure in the region over the past 15 years.

Social Exclusion in Latin America: Perception, Reality and Implications Jere R. Behrman Alejandro Gaviria Miguel Székely Income inequality is higher in Latin America and the Caribbean than in any other region of the world, and precisely because of this skewed distribution, the region’s absolute poverty rates are much higher than one would.

Exclusion in Health in Latin America and the Caribbean (PAHO Occasional Publication) By Pan American Health Organization (Author) In Health & fitness, Medicine. Catholic Relief Services, CRS, the international relief and development agency of the U.S.

Catholic community, works in 19 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, and has implemented development and humanitarian programs in the Northern Triangle of Central America for decades.

the extension of social protection in health for excluded populations in Latin America Social Protection in Health in Latin America and the Caribbean—examines national two studies come to the same conclusions regarding the profile of exclusion and its causes in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Doing Business in the Philippines is the second subnational report of the Doing Business series in the Philippines. In the first, Doing Business in the Philippinesquantitative indicators on business regulations were analyzed for 21 cities in 3 regions: Luzon, the Visayas, and Mindanao.

Social exclusion in Latin America and the Caribbean predominantly affects indigenous peoples, Afro-descendants, persons with disabilities, and those living with the stigma of HIV/ AIDS. Williams Institute Reading Room: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resources in Law and Public Policy: Latin America & the Caribbean A guide to resources in the Williams Institute Reading Room, part of the Williams Institute on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Public Policy at the UCLA School of : Stephanie Anayah.

The book is essential reading for public security and development specialists looking for a deeper understanding of the drivers of violence in Latin America and the Caribbean, and insights into how to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past.' Robert Muggah - Research Director, Instituto Igarapé, Brazil.

Latin America and the Caribbean will soon face the challenges of an aging population. The book provides an introduction to the concepts and. Public health policies and practice in the Caribbean and Latin America: a historical perspective is a three-year project, led by Dr Henrice Altink who is Head of the Department of History at involves a network of historians from Brazil, Chile, Barbados, Trinidad and the UK, who challenge the diffusionist model of medicine and health in non-European contexts.The United States’ geographic proximity to Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as its extensive trade, migration, and border relationships with countries in the hemisphere, make addressing health issues in the Americas a matter of national interest.

Challenges include the persistence of high maternal and infant mortality rates; diarrheal and respiratory diseases; and vaccine-preventable.

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